In a Vase on Monday – It’s Hot! Hot! Hot!

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Following on from last week’s In a Vase on Monday I have used another mug from the kitchen cupboard.  In the past few posts I’ve found a container and then picked the flowers.  This time I knew I wanted to use the last of the hot flowers in the garden.  Once I had my selection I searched for the best way to display and compliment them and found this cheerful mug at the back of the mug cupboard.
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The crocosmia is almost over but I was able to retrieve a few sprigs with flowers at the top of stems.
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The Calendula is also slowly coming to an end, and sadly it is falling foul of mildew.  Now is the time for the nasturtiums to start taking over the flowerbed and is winding its way around every thing at the moment!

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For a little bit of greenery I have used Cosmos leaves.

Here is my list of my Hot! Hot! Hot! In a Vase on Monday:

  • nasturtiums
  • calendula
  •  crocosmia
  • cosmos leaves

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Thank you Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for hosting this meme, which ensures I do regularly pick flowers from the garden to enjoy indoors.

In a Vase Monday – After the Rain

There is a delightful meme, called ‘In a Vase Monday’ hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.   I joined in a few times last year but not regular basis.   I remembered it today after torrential rain this morning and a garden damage inspection, when it cleared and the sun came out.

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My Monday vase is my favourite jug, and should you look back on old posts you may well see it a lot. It’s just the right depth for those flowers that have had to be pruned due to damage of one sort or another. Also, the raised lip keeps the heads standing straight.

It consists of two stems of Veronica, a couple of Philadelphus (mock orange), two white Nigella (Love in a Mist), a stem of  Astrantia, white Hydrangea ear, a piece of Penstemon (Garnet) and last but not least a Joie de Vivre rose bud.  Surprising what you can get into a small vase.

https://ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com

 

End of Month View – September 2015

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What a stroke of luck I booked this week off work!  The weather has been glorious, although with a marked nip in the air at night, during the day it’s been warm and sunny.  I love September.  Some people groan “oh it’s climate change”, but I remember going to school in September dressed in a summer dress, pullover and blazer, by lunchtime we would be sitting in the sun on the school fields having discarded our pullovers and jumpers.  50 years ago no one used the expression climate change – it was just the norm.

I am writing this on the 2nd October, a few days late for the EOMV, and it’s still warm and sunny.  The only bugbear I have at this time of year is fighting my way through the spiders and the many webs they have managed to weave around the garden, trapping me at every turn.
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I do think that the plants are a little confused, and have been lulled into believing it’s still time to be flowering.  My Compassion Rose is still in bloom, and today I noticed a lot of greenfly.

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I am still cutting sweet peas, but I suspect this may be the last lot which is sad as I have had an excellent supply for my mum, who loves sweet peas.

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I also noticed that Penstemon ‘Sour Grapes’ , whilst looking a little leggy is producing new flowers.

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In the middle of the garden, Penstemon ‘Garnet’ and Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ are not ready to close down for autumn yet.

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I tried to get away from the pink theme in my garden this year but by default and not design it would seem that pink is still the predominant  colour, after green.  However, I am really proud of the Cosmos ‘Pied Piper’ grown from seed, as long as I keep remembering to deadhead them on a regular basis they are providing lots of colour in the bottom border.

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The side patio was becoming a bit of a jungle and in need of a serious tidy up.  It is now looking a little better and the garden wheelie bin is almost full. Here, again, the spiders lay their traps for me, stringing their webs from one side to the other, which makes it a bit like running the gauntlet when I go to the bins.  I now carry refuse bags in front of me, face high but still get caught sometimes.

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As I was photographing the garden this morning, I noticed that the Fatsia Japonica is throwing up their peculiar spikes of what I suppose could be called flowers.

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At this time of the year the hydrangeas slowly move into their autumn shades.  The Madame Emile Mouilliere is turning from a pure white to a pale green tinged with pink.

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Still on the side patio. I am not sure what happened but a few months ago half of the choysia died.  I lopped off all the dead parts and am happy to say that it has recovered and is healthy again.  It did me a favour as it was really rather large and it now a lot neater.

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Regular followers of my blog will know that I have been reviewing an online 4 week container gardening course run by MyGardenSchool.  It has made me take stock of the odd assortment of containers and plants that I have dotted around  and  I am slowly having a sort out and rethink.  Looking after pots of plants requires a lot more thought than I usually give them which is probably why they always look so neglected by the end of the summer.

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Moving on to the back garden again.  The north facing side of the garden will not see anymore sun now until next year.  It gets very damp and boggy, fortunately the hydrangea and astilbe live very happily in these conditions.

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On this trip around the garden, a quick visit to the front garden, which doesn’t often get a look in. The Cotoneaster is glowing red in the sunshine and always amazes me, it grows in the wall and I can’t think where it gets its goodness from.

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That almost ends my EOMV tour of the garden for the end of September, well two days into October! Before I go, let me share the Sedum which is looking magnificent, as usual, and the nasturtiums that always appear about this time of the year and brighten up a dark corner.
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Thank you Helen from Patient Gardener at http://www.patientgardener.wordpress.com for hosting the End of Month View. Please hop over to her blog and take a look at all the other EOMV’s from a whole load of other garden bloggers from around the world as well as the UK.

End of Month View -May 2015

This post is a day early but as I have found time to sit down I thought I would post it today.  I don’t write as many blog posts these days so making up for lost time.  Thank you Helen at Patient Gardener for hosting this meme, it has proved to be an invaluable diary of the garden over the years I have been writing my blog.

I don’t know about where you live but we have had a distinct shortage of rain this month.  My water butt ran empty during the week and the soil (clay!) has been rock hard and almost impossible to work.   We did have an afternoon of rain yesterday with more promised tomorrow, so I will be out there with the hoe to loosen the hard pan of soil at the back of my border at the bottom of the garden.   It’s still quite cold also which is holding back hardening off my plants and planting them out, this includes the sweet peas, Amaranthus and Cosmos. 

love peonies and was really disappointed when it failed to flower last year.  However, it has graced the flower border this year with three blooms.  It was great to see that the heavy rain yesterday didn’t beat them down.  

The roses are looking good too, with lots of buds on the Compassion rose.  I have pinched out the side buds to encourage larger blooms, I may regret this but someone told me once that this is what rose growers.


The Alliums are standing proud along side the Aquilegia.  It would seem that I have a flowerbed full of plants starting with the letter A.   Alongside the Alliums, there is Agapanthus, Aquelgia, Astrantia, Alstroemeria and Acanthus.  This was certainly not deliberate!  I was so pleased to see Nora Barlow this year, it didn’t make an appearance in 2014 and I thought I had lost it.  Nature never fails to surprise does it?   A very small William Guiness is doing its best to make a show, fighting for space with the emerging Dahlia.

Aquilegia Nora Barlow

Aquilegia William Guinness
There is a Ceonothus in the garden at the end of my garden which always flowers a good month before mine.  I’m never sure why, perhaps it gets more hours of sunshine.  Happily mine is now flowering just as theirs is dying off.  

Finally, I will leave you with the beautiful Iris by the front door that welcomes me home.  

  

End of Month View – March 2015

It is getting a little warmer now and everything in the garden is full of the joy of spring.   We have been unlucky this last week with some very strong winds and I, for one, suffered the loss of seedlings when my plastic greenhouse blew over.  Fortunately it is still early enough to get going again.  I shoved my sweet pea seeds, which were sprouting, back into their pots hoping that they will recover. 

Today, a few days after the end of March, it is mild and wet but during a lull in the drizzle I managed a couple of hours in the garden.  The soil is burgeoning with weeds and ideal to work at the moment so I spent most of the time hoeing and adding organic compost.   

  The Forsythia and Ribes are contributing to wonderful spring colour in the garden.  The lawn desperately needs some work this year.  I have put feed and weed on it and now there are large black patches where the moss was.  Also there are bald patches caused by me walking on the lawn when it was very wet and frosty. 

   

I love the Spirea at this time of the year because the leaves are beautiful shades of rosy pink and russet.

 

The south facing border is a spring delight with daffodils, forget-me-nots, and peony shoots. 

 

 As I walked around I could see the euphorbia, which I thought had died, has recovered for another year. 

 

 On the opposite flower bed the tiny shoots of the euphorbia ‘Fireglow’  are making an appearance.  It seems to have spread so I am expecting a good show this year.

  A few years ago I planted a clematis ‘Josephine’ at the base of the Elder and it is full of buds so the contrast of the pink flowers and the purple leaves on the Elder should look good within a month or two. 

  In my last post I said I was delighted that the Clematis Montana ‘Elizabeth’ had survived it’s severe hacking.  This year I think the shed is going to be covered in pretty fragrant flowers. 

   

 

The lasagna pots on the side patio are blooming well with an assortment of daffs and the tulips are slowly coming up also. 

   

  

 Although the Peiris is looking a little thin, it is flowing well so can’t be too unhappy. 

  Thank you Helen from Patient Gardener for hosting this great meme, which serves as an extremely useful record of how the gardening is fairing over the years. 

Next month, when the EOMV for April is put together, there will be lots more of exciting new growth to show you. 

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day 15 Feb 2015

Two happy things today. The first is that there really are blooms in the garden and second, it is a beautifully sunny day here on the South coast of England. This makes writing a post for Garden Bloggers Bloom day a bit of a treat; I haven’t contributed to this monthly meme hosted by Carol of May Dreams Garden blog for a while.

I had to take my iPad out to take photographs because my laptop has died making my camera pointless as I won’t be able to transfer photos using a memory card. Also I am writing this post on the iPad and anyone trying to write using the WordPress app will know how frustrating it can be.   The iPad actually takes some excellent quality photos so not being able to use my big camera is ok.

Anyway, here goes!

Hellebores
Always lovely to see this time of the year. A bog standard variety and I always promise myself to buy new ones but never get around to it.

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Snowdrops
Like the hellebores, these are a common garden variety but come up every year and are pretty.

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Primroses
There are only a few, the others are still to flower but there is plenty of time.

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Pieris ‘Forest Flame
A shrub that is guaranteed to have something worth photographing at anytime of the year.

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Iris ‘Gordon
Regular readers will probably be fed up with seeing these by now. This early pot is almost over now, but there are some in the other pots that are just about to come out, so more to photograph.

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Hydrangea
Can I get away with dried flowers? I think so!

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Japanese Amenome
Last month I showed my Japanese Anemone which was flowering. Lo and behold it is still flowering, despite the snow and ice. Poor confused little plant.

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Skimmia
Alright, I know that strictly speaking berries are not blooms but they are colourful and nice to include. I get confused with Skimmia, There is a large shrub in the front garden covered in red berries all year round, and in the summer it also produces tiny white flowers. In the back garden I have one that produces clusters of tiny dark berries in the winter. Both, apparently, are Skimmia Japonica. I read the first one is a female plant and the second one is a male. Can anyone shed any further light?

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Narcissi ‘Paperwhite’
My final photo for this GBBD post is a pot of narcissi bulbs that I forgot I had and despite having no soil and being left outside, I unearthed them today and they are in flower. You can’t get the better of nature can you!

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Please pay a visit to May Dreams Garden and take a look at what is in bloom in bloggers gardens around the world.