Garden blogging, Garden Meme

Six on Saturday – 7th April 2018

I really should think carefully and plan when I’m going to blog to make sure that when I publish a post it doesn’t coincide with specific meme’s, such as ‘Six on Saturday’ hosted by The Propagator Blog. That is just what I have done – two posts in one day!

Nature has taken a bit of a battering this winter and is slow off the blocks. Not only is my heavy clay soil laying in water slow to drain, the snails are out in force and eating almost every young shoot in sight. There is life in the garden, apart from slimy critters and these are my Six on Saturday.

1. Ajuga ‘Chocolate Chip’ Planted last year as a very small plant, it has spread into a considerable sized clump and is going to look very pretty. Excellent ground cover!

2. Ribes – variety unknown I cut back what had become a large shrub dramatically last year to the point I thought I wasn’t going to see any flowers this year, but although it’s looking somewhat thin, there are some very pretty flowers – phew! I’m sure it is a darker pink than years before so maybe it has done the plant some good.

3. Peony I am so in love with the peony as it throws out spring shoots, almost to the point I prefer the dark burgundy to the actual flowers. Despite its age, about 7/8 years old, it only ever has a couple of blooms and for the rest of the year is always a disappointment.

4. Sambucus Nigra(Elderflower) Like the peony shoots, the elderflower at this time of the year fascinates me. From the gnarled old bare winter branches appear very dark maroon tiny leaves that in no time become long ranging branches. A magnificent tree to have in a garden.

5. Primroses I spied these right at the back of one of my borders, hidden in amongst the wood pile and ivy where they are at their happiest. So very pretty and along with daffodils and tulips are an iconic spring flower.

6. Chinodoxia (Glory of the Snow) Not sure why they have this name, mine are only just flowering and kept their heads well down during the snow. They are another delicate, delightful, spring flower. I’ve seen spectacular carpets of them at West Dean Gardens but mine are in containers nestled amongst the tulips and late narcissus all of which are about to flower and may well be ready for next week’s Six on Saturday.

Please take a look at the other contributions on The Propagator Blog it’s a great time of the year and a good yardstick as to how nature is behaving in other people’s gardens.

Garden blogging, Restoring a garden

Restoring a Hampshire Garden – Chapter 2

KEEPING IVY AND HER FRIEND HONEYSUCKLE IN THEIR PLACE

This latest task wasn’t so much a restoration job, but a ‘let’s see what we have here’ job. There are times when this is necessary to help see the bigger picture.

The garage, strangely built at the back of the house taking up some of the garden, is an ugly building. It is no surprise a trellis was built along the wall with climbers to camouflage it.

The planting here consisted of 3 climbing roses, believed to be ‘Albertine’, several ivies, a honeysuckle and a wisteria. The wisteria was well and truly dead so removing it was an easy task. Not surprising it had died, the raised bed was on top of the paving, so only about 6″ deep. I’m amazed anything grew, but ivy doesn’t care where she puts her roots as long as she is allowed to grow.

Everything had been allowed to run wild for a good few years and trying to untangle and remove twisted stems through the solid trellis proved impossible. We had to resort to taking it down, it had been built in situ nailed to batons and solidly made. It took three of us to remove it from the wall and it was extremely heavy, I can assure you! My Son in Law climbed on to the roof with trepidation to attack from above. The ivy and the honeysuckle had made its way across the garage roof and into and around the guttering, which made it a hard job to clear, a bit like untangling knitting wool. My daughter and I tackled the rampant plants from below, ducking at each shower of debris and dust that fell on us as we pulled stuff away from the wall – headscarves or hats should have been the order of the day. My head itched for hours afterwards.

As with all jobs, putting something back together again always proves much harder than dismantling. I mentioned earlier, this framework was very heavy and lining it up again to the correct batons was a feat. In view of its weight my back was beginning to complain so I was given the job of using the electric drill to screw it back into place. A much easier job and quite satisfying in a strange way.

With all the foot traffic and removal of roots, the weakened and somewhat rotting boards eventually collapsed, which is another job to sort out. This will be at a later date, there are other jobs taking priority on the garden to-do list.

We uncovered windows in the garage and the ivy had even crept its way through the window frames. However, at the end of what transpired to be a longer job than anticipated, there is now an area, a bit like a bare wall, asking to be filled up. The roses have been saved, despite not having a good dept of soil for their roots. They’ve been pruned and will be carefully trained to grow to splendid glory.

There are lots of planting ideas, but if any of you gardeners reading this have some suggestions, all ideas will be looked at. I have to remember I can only advise and help, it’s not my garden. Honeysuckle is always pretty as long as it is kept under control, a perfumed variety such as ‘Graham Thomas’ might be a possibility, you can never go wrong with clematis such as Montana ‘Elizabeth’ with its fabulous fragrance. I think ivy had her day, but we will have to keep an eye on any tiny roots left behind – we all know she is difficult to eradicate.