In a Vase on Monday – Discovering a Victorian Jug

I’m getting quite hooked on In a Vase on Monday because the garden is full of flowers I want to show them off.   Finding different vessels to hold them is a challenge.  I’m not overly artistic or with a florists ability, so I generally end up with a bunch of flowers in an uninspiring jug!

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I store all my, somewhat plain, vases on the top of my kitchen cupboard  along with a jug shelf with various pretty jugs collected over the years.  It’s funny how you can see something every day but not notice it.  Right at the corner is a jug with the very dried bouquet from my eldest daughter’s wedding in 2001 – I haven’t the heart to throw it away, although it is now almost fossilised!    The jug holding this bouquet is an old family one.   It has embossed figureheads on two sides, but no marking at the bottom. I was told it had been passed down the family and in commemoration of the Corn Laws, so whilst writing this post, I Googled ‘commemorative Corn Law jugs’.  To my amazement an almost identical vase appeared and quite rightly it is a Victorian Relief jug c1850.  I had better treat it with more care.

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I gave it a good clean and collected some flowers from the garden.

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Looking at this now, the arrangement is not quite symmetrical but as I am no florist, I am not going fuss too much about it.

I have used:

  • Nigella,
  • the lovely tall white spikes of Veronica,
  • Marigolds,
  • Alchemilia Mollis,
  • Joie de Vivre Rose,
  • Verbena Bonariensis
  • Astilbe
  • Cosmos

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To get some great ideas and see some interesting and inspiring Vase on a Monday please pay a visit to  Rambling in The Garden.  

4 thoughts on “In a Vase on Monday – Discovering a Victorian Jug

  1. This is lovely Ronnie! I don’t believe I have ever produced a symmetrical vase, so I shouldn’t worry about that. 😉 The marigold and verbena add lots of gorgeous rich colour. I’m sure the figures on your jug would be honoured. 🙂

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  2. Glad you are not going to fret that it is not symmetrical – it is very pleasing to the eye whether it is symmetrical or not. Veronica is not appreciated as much as it should be as it is such a useful and pretty plant and its colorful companions sit very nicely with it in your intriguing vase. Robert Peel is a local in this area, by the way, so there are numerous references to him around

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