Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – February Foliage

Gosh I am on a roll!  Having not written anything on the blog for three months, all of a sudden I have found things to blog about again.  This is my third blog post in as many days – readers will be suffering from Hurtledto60 overload if I am not careful, so I will keep this post short.

What gave me incentive today for this post?   Garden Bloggers Foliage Day : GBFD.   This is a monthly meme hosted by Christina at My Hesperides Garden.

I was listening to the gardeners questions program on local radio this morning and was pulled up short when I heard “We are almost in March”. Crickey where did that time go, it seems only yesterday it was Christmas.   March means the beginning of Spring and with it brings new life and foliage into the garden.   So walking around this morning with camera in hand I found the following foliage:

Peony.   I have always loved the way the peony leaves appear, looking like tiny fingers unfolding.  Maybe they are crossing their fingers that the conditions are just right to produce a good amount of flowers this year instead of the meagre two blooms last year.

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Aquilegia.   Sometimes I think the fresh new rosettes of the Aquilegia are more exciting than when it is in full bloom.  There don’t seem to be as many Aquilegia in the garden this year, usually they are everywhere.  However, most had reverted to their natural state and were a boring dull pink so maybe now is the year to introduce new ones.

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Hydrangea.  I bought a white hydrangea last year and it lives in a large pot on the side patio and produced the most enormous flower heads.  It is now bursting with new bright green foliage and is going to be a splendid plant in its second year.

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Fennel.    The new fennel leaves are small and fluffy and, to me, look like little trees.  This is an old plant and grows to about 6 foot every year.  I often wonder if it is about time to dig it up and cook the bulbs but I think perhaps in view of its age, it may not be such a good idea and I will just let it remain in its architectural glory during the summer months.

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Then, of course, there is the hardy foliage that lasts throughout the winter months giving constant green hues to the garden.   These include:-

Euphorbia

_DSC0890 (1024x683)Eyrisium (Wallflowers)

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Ferns – I am sorry I do not remember what these two are called, maybe someone can help me out with this please.

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Not only has my blog writing mojo come back, so has my photography mojo – hurrah!!

Thank you Christina for hosting this meme and I hope those reading this will hop over to your blog and take a look at your exciting and interesting mediterranean garden.

9 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – February Foliage

  1. Lovely pictures, I wish I had a green thumb but then that would indicate I am an alien from outer space and I would be accused of alien spores. By the way we have bird of paradise in our front yard and orange trees in the back. Did you guess Florida? Your right I am in the land of lala land.

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  2. Cracking idea to focus on foliage rather than our usual flowers ! Lots of lovely fresh new leaves unfurling which just add to the general giddiness I’m feeling, because it is really here ! Spring! The start of all things wonderful in the garden…

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  3. Hi – Fennel is so yum – Slice the bulb very finely into slivers and toss with seasonal veg – yum either cooked or with salade type veg. Our’s was young but have a go! It grows wild on the road sides here but now popular as a veg Can also chuck in with roast veg. I prefer as above slivered finely! You may be looking forward to spring but I am hoping our summer keeps on and on! Lovely swim 300 metres as Tindalls just down the road.

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  4. thanks so much for joining in this month Ronnie, it is so nice to see you back blogging. New foliage appearing is so exciting isn’t it – new hope! Is you fennel a Florence fennel the type you eat the swollen basal stem for wild fennel, sounds more like this if it gets very tall, in which case there’s nothing to stop it growing every year. You could collect and dry the flowers for use in cooking – great on roast potatoes or with mishrooms.

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