In a Vase on Monday – A Spring Posy

I think I may have said this before, but it is often only seeing posts by others that I suddenly notice the garden really does have variety of choice for flower arrangements, no matter how small the flowers are.   Harriet Rycroft posted the prettiest posy on Instagram yesterday, which inspired me to venture into the garden with a carefully selected vintage cream jug from the jug shelf and a pair or scissors. 


The cream jug is one of many that I collect as they catch my eye.  Sadly they frequently collect more dust than being used for arrangements, something I must address.   I chose this one in particular because of the pretty soft blue and yellow wash around it. 


Scrambling my way in behind shrubs at the bottom of the garden into the tiny wild bit where lots of primroses grow, I picked just a few.  It must be a throw back but I always feel I am being naughty picking primroses! Am I the only one?  Then I chose a couple of Anemone ‘blanda’ and a stem of Chionodoxa which had whilted slightly.  


I grow a lot of Tête-à-tête daffodils, although I have often come across double headed ones, this is the first quadruple headed daffodil I have come across.  It is great for a posy, filling it at the flower end but not taking up extra room at the stem end. 


Proving I have given thought to my In Vase on Monday posy, to bring the colours together I added a few purple and yellow violas.  I adore violas, they have such sunny happy faces and are great for a hanging basket by the front door.  They always smile and say ‘Welcome Home’ – they do to me anyway!


Thank you Cathy from Rambling in the Garden for hosting this meme.  Cathy always has interesting and delightful flower arrangements on In a Vase Monday.   Check it out, this Monday she has a display in colours of the Union Jack. 

Look Up and Smell the Blossom

I’ve been so busy looking downwards, watching and waiting for the daffodils and now the tulips to burst into colour, I have almost missed the wonderful blossom there is is around at the moment. 

The warmth has brought everything out in abundance, we just keep our fingers crossed that the blossom doesn’t get nipped by a late frost.  We are all to aware not to get complacent and caught out by cold nights and should still keep the fleece handy until the end of April.   Although we can’t cover the blossom trees with fleece! 

There is a breathtakingly beautiful blossom tree around the corner from me, on my way to my Mum’s nursing home.  I have no idea what it is but it has a real cotton wool look about it.  It was seeing this today, that spurred me into taking photos so I could write a post showing off blossoms on the 26 March 2017.

The Magnolias are looking particularly splendid this year, and the one above is in the garden of Mum’s home.  I do envy those residents who open their curtains and can see this so close up.   


My neighbours Quince is covered in pretty dark pink blossom.  The little House Sparrows love sitting in this tree and chirp away to their hearts content.   


Growing up against the front garden wall is an old Skimmia.  What endears me to this shrub is the white blossom in Spring together with the red berries that are on it all year round.   It is so good to look at from my lounge window.

In my back garden, there is a large ball of yellow.  I’m sure the forsythia is better this year than it has been for ages.


One of my favourite spring blossoms is the flowering Ribes, despite its pungent cat smell later as the flowers begin to die off. 


As a promise of things to come, the lilac tree is covered in tiny little buds so will give a grand display of lilac blossom before too long.   A few years ago it was heavy with blossom and you could catch its perfume way down the road, so fingers crossed it will deliver this year. 

You Can Never Have Too Many Daffodils

Seeing swathes of yellow daffodils really lifts the heart!  I drive to work on the A24 and it’s wonderful to see so many daffodils on the verges, and as I enter the town, the banks are complete yellow.  I looked at them last week as I crawled along with the local traffic, and it struck me how sad that in another month everything will be green again and we will have to wait until next Spring to drive through yellow corridors. 

I bought a large selection of daffodil/narcissi last autumn and all the back breaking planting of the bulbs has paid dividends.  The garden is full of a various pretty daffs, most of which unfortunately I can’t name. 

The narcissi above I can name, it is called ‘Iced Folly’ and the photo I took this morning in the rain makes it look even more beautiful don’t you think? 

On one of my many trips to the local garden center I came back having bought a large pot of narcissi called ‘Winston Churchill’ with the promise of clusters of creamy white, double flowers,  flecked with orange.  It looks like the label was wrong, because it has produced the above flower – very pretty but definitely not creamy white! 

Right in the middle of the pot, the above flower popped up!  It looks a little like ‘Rip van Winkle’ in shape but not colour.  A friend looked at it and thought it was possibly malformed due to a diseased bulb.  I asked on Twitter and Instagram if anyone could name it but disappoingly had no response so maybe no one knows what it is called and it will remain one of life’s little mysteries. 

To end this short post, above is vase of daffodils I picked today, that had been beaten down by the overnight rain. 

Enjoy Spring! 

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – March 2017

Oh what a delight it is seeing colour in the garden and to be able to take lots of photos for GBBD this 15th March 2017.

We are experiencing a few mild days here on the Sussex south coast,  which is warming up the garden and bringing everything into life.  However, while writing this there is a news report on the TV about snow blizzards and icy winds on the East Coast of the USA, and I do hope it doesn’t come our way.  I am all too aware of snow in April, but there is always hope that it won’t happen.

I am really happy with the variety of daffodils and narcissus in the garden, and there are many more waiting to burst into flower, so plenty opportunities to take more photos.  It really is adding brightness around the back garden,albeit hosting minute slugs which are nibbling away at the petals.

Rather than write any more for you to read,  I am just going to post photos instead in colour sections to enjoy.

BLUE

DSC_0178
CHINIODOXA

DSC_0150 ANEMONE BLANDA

YELLOW

DSC_0172
FORSYTHIA

PINK

DSC_0176
RIBES

DSC_0158

HELLEBORES

PURPLE

DSC_0160

PRIMULAS

WHITE

DSC_0179
PIERIS ‘Forest Flame’

DSC_0164
PRIMULA

DSC_0162
TULIP KAUFMANNIANA ‘ACILLA’
I have a ‘wild’ bit at the end of the garden, which is quite overgrown with ivy and a pile of wood that I leave as a bug hotel.   In amongst all of this there arie some proper primroses, which along with daffodils, I see as a true harbinger of spring.

DSC_0170
PRIMROSES
On the 15th of each month Carol at May Dreams Gardens hosts this meme.  Please hop over there and take a look at all the contributions to Carol’s GBBD as well as looking at her lovely garden.

A Tulip Surprise

It’s surprising what little it takes to produce the feeling of sheer delight together with some frustration on occasions.

After growing just a few tulips in pots in 2016, last autumn I went mad and bought a lot of tulip bulbs.  I didn’t spend a lot of money from well known websites, and went to my local garden centre instead and my planting ‘scheme’ was to distribute them in no particular order across the flowerbeds.   The fault in this planting came to light this morning, when I found two tulips in flower that I didn’t know the name of, hence the sheer delight coupled with frustration.

DSC_0143
Tulip Kaufmanniana ‘Ancilla’
After posting a couple of photos on Twitter to ask what this pretty white tulip was called and getting no response, which is not surprising really, it’s Monday morning and most people are working, I then searched out the old bulb packets which I had carefully stored in a drawer and not thrown away.  Eventually I found one labeled mix of 25 bulbs called Tulip Kaufmannia ‘Mixed’, and turning to Google found this white tulip was ‘Ancilla’.

DSC_0144

The difference between the closed flower and when it opens is spectacular. I love the red and yellow ring around the stamen which is very eye-catching and if you look very carefully there are tiny little pink dots on the tip of the petals.   According to the pack, the other tulips will be orange and red.

Kaufmanniana Tulips are also known as a water lily tulip.  They have short sturdy stems and, as proven today, are usually the first tulips to flower.   Ideal for ground cover, they are also good for containers and window boxes and will gradually multiply if left in the ground.

8828627583006

 

This little photo on the left is courtesy of the Thompson & Morgan website, gives you an idea of the other colours that are yet to come.  Spring is such an exciting time.